In my post on MindLink Anywhere last week, I mentioned that one big value-add from the software was its ability to work on Linux. Options for accessing Lync services on Linux are limited. Though in the past couple years they’ve improved a lot, both in number and quality.

What else is available for “Lync on Linux”? Let’s take a look and see what’s out there.

Running Lync Server 2013 on a Linux Server? No. But you can access it from Linux computers.

Unless you install Windows Server in a VM, this isn’t happening. Lync Server 2013 is intended for Windows Servers. Which makes sense, honestly – Unified Communications hooks into Exchange and SharePoint, also Windows-platform servers. If Lync ran on Linux, it would do so in an underperforming state, users unable to take full advantage of its capabilities.

Fortunately, this does not mean Linux users are completely in the cold! There are ways to access Lync’s services on Linux desktops and mobile devices.

Linux Lync Clients

Sadly, there is no native Lync client for the Linux desktop. You must use third-party products to connect with Lync. Only a couple of them exist as yet.

Judging from my research, the most popular choice is Pidgin. Makes sense – one of the most reliable, full-featured IM platforms on Linux. Adding Lync to Pidgin? Just one more service.

Choose from any of the following blog posts to install Lync into Pidgin:

  1. Microsoft Lync on Linux – GeekySchmidt.com
  2. Configuring Pidgin to work with Lync server in Arch Linux – I Fix Therefore I Am
  3. Add a Lync/Office Communicator Account to Pidgin/Ubuntu – ITSwapShop.com
  4. Setting Pidgin Up for Lync 2013 – AskUbuntu.comWync-Logo

No matter the method, you may have to deal with limitations when using Lync through Pidgin. Commenters have claimed everything from having to manually add contacts, to voice and video chat not working.

Another third-party client usable for Lync on Linux is Wync, made by Fisil. Wync is actually designed to work with Lync, and Fisil does offer support. Most functions work – Voice, IM/Chat, Screen Sharing and File Transfer.

I was only able to test it out briefly, but Wync was stable and made clear calls. (Tested on Ubuntu 32-bit desktop.) It’s great to see an actual Lync client available on Linux systems!

Lync Web App

Works, but only for attending Lync Meetings by default. No voice, video or IM.

Important distinction here: If you’re running Lync Server 2010, you will need Silverlight to run the Lync Web App. Silverlight is Windows-only. But there is a Linux version of Silverlight, called Moonlight.

Here’s an AskUbuntu discussion to help you work out Lync 2010 Web App with Moonlight. You should find Moonlight in your repository of choice…but if it’s not there, try these direct downloads: Moonlight for Chrome & Firefox.

If you’re running Lync Server 2013, Lync Web App does not require Silverlight. However, expect a very limited experience on a Linux desktop (if it works at all).

Android

I’ve heard people say that the #1 operating system in the world is actually Android–a Linux distribution. If so, Microsoft really should spend more effort on its Lync Mobile client for Android. The reviews are full of problem reports!

That said, I’m glad the client at least exists and is supported directly by Microsoft. Android isn’t poised to go anywhere but up, and I want a good solid version of Lync available to its users.

Lync Online on Linux?

Using Lync Online? You’ll still face the same problems as above. Fortunately, the same solutions also work. If you use Lync Online in a Linux environment, I’d say try Wync first, and then Pidgin. See which one works better for your day-to-day.

Here’s a blog post on how to get Pidgin working with Lync, specifically focused on using Office 365: Configuring Pidgin Instant Messenger for Office 365 LYNC – VincentPassaro.com

What About Skype?

There is a version of Skype available for Linux, so at least our Skype brothers & sisters are OK. A little better off than Lync users…at least for now.

If anything, this could be a positive sign for future versions. Depending on the upgrade path Microsoft takes for Lync & Skype integration, we may have ourselves a Lync client (or at least a Lync-friendly client) on Linux soon.

Linux Alternatives to Lync Server

What’s that? You only use Linux on your company’s servers? Well, I’m afraid it could be a while before you can enjoy Lync Server’s capabilities (if ever). But fear not! Alternatives do exist. None are quite the same as Lync, but they can give you the necessary communications tools.

Here are 3 popular Linux/open-source alternatives:

  • Avaya: Avaya has the Aura Platform for a VoIP, chat & video offering.
  • Twilio: Twilio is a cloud-based voice and text product suite that’s quite highly reviewed. Useful on the phone side, though not as full-featured as Lync.
  • Asterisk: Asterisk is a framework for building powerful communications systems. As I understand it, several enterprises have used Asterisk to build their own custom phone systems.

Of these, if I had to recommend a Lync Server alternative to a Linux-using business, I’d recommend Asterisk. Then Avaya.e00cb7b29fc9f70724e906d87e4e4dbf-tux-penguin-clip-art

Lync is Making its Way Onto Linux

While PlanetMagpie is a Microsoft shop and supports all Microsoft servers (not just Lync Server), sometimes I like to see how Linux is doing in comparison. It’s encouraging that there’s this much development regarding Lync. More is sure to come, both within the Linux community and from official channels. (Okay, mostly from the Linux community.)

Does your office use Linux and Lync? How do you make it work for you? I’d like to hear your experiences.

Next week, more reader inquiries! Join us then.

Lync on Linux: How to Access Lync Services from Linux Computers
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7 thoughts on “Lync on Linux: How to Access Lync Services from Linux Computers

    • April 20, 2015 at 8:06 am
      Permalink

      Justin,
      Thanks for the comments. Actually I meant “underperforming state” as follows: even if you could run Lync Server on a Linux server, you wouldn’t have Exchange Server and SharePoint available for Unified Communications integration. Lync wouldn’t be able to provide all the tools it does on a Windows platform. At least its on-prem version – Office 365 may reach Linux systems pretty soon (which would be a smarter move, in my opinion).

      Hope that clarifies.

      Reply
  • January 11, 2016 at 10:11 am
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    Hi,

    I’m heading a project to implement a set of Lync-features into Pidgin. We have so far added support for:

    – File Transfer
    – Secure RTP (SRTP)
    – Desktop Screen Sharing ( Linux -> Windows, Windows -> Linux, Linux Linux)
    – Conferencing (with screen sharing enabled both ways)
    – Lync Enterprise Voice (Lync EV)

    We are currently working on adding support for video as well (h264).

    Our work is published in a PPA on Launchpad [1]. The sources can also be found on Github [2].

    Our contributions are slowly but steady finding their way upstream. We have contributed to Farstream, Pidgin, libpurple, sipe, FreeRDP, libnice. And it looks like we’ll add Gstreamer to the list as well.

    [1] https://launchpad.net/~sipe-collab
    [2] https://github.com/tieto

    Regards,
    Niklas

    Reply
    • January 11, 2016 at 12:18 pm
      Permalink

      Niklas,

      Great idea! Does your plugin have Windows support? If so, I’d love to test it on one of my systems.

      Reply
  • October 26, 2016 at 11:18 pm
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    There is Sky, from https://tel.red/linux.php, works pretty well, I have not tested all the features, not even the call features I use the windows machine(blush), but seems doable. Also does not synchronize the conversations between the machines, which is a little annoying, but there you are, at least something right?

    Reply
    • February 23, 2017 at 6:06 am
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      yes, Sky works pretty well. Only I couldn’t figure out how to search for colleagues in the network. I have to add them as “external”, then I can reach them. The “search or add contact” field doesn’t work for me and I can’t find any settings for this.

      Reply

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