By now you’ve likely heard about Atlassian’s shuttering of its HipChat & Stride products. The decision has many implications, from Atlassian’s future as a company to the ChatOps space worldwide.

HipChat Logo
Still smiling!

Other bloggers have asked important questions about this move. How will this affect Slack users? Will Stride users go to Slack or jump ship to Teams?

All valid questions. But in this post, I’d like to ask a few others. Questions which came up during my own reading. Some already have answers. Most don’t…those will come with time, as the shuttering takes effect & the market responds.

I’m documenting these 6 questions here for discussion’s sake. If you currently use HipChat or Stride, you have a decision to make before 2019. I hope these questions help you tackle it.

Any & all feedback welcomed…particularly from current HipChat/Stride users!

 

Six Questions We Need to Ask about HipChat & ChatOps as a Whole

The Developers Question. HipChat is, as I understand, popular with developers. Particularly developers who work on Atlassian products. Finding another chat platform is easy for a developer…but will Slack try to make them welcome? Developer discussions can get very technical, with code snippets and live testing on the fly.

Slack does have code snippet capability. But so does Teams. So does Google Hangouts, to a degree.

Atlassian-friendly developers will need an environment that contributes to their work, via app integrations and workflows. How well the Atlassian/Slack partnership works will make a big difference.

 

The Mid-Market Question. ChatOps products like Stride, HipChat, and Slack are popular among mid-market companies as well as enterprises. Yet I’ve seen enterprises as the exclusive focus for most of the current speculation.

In our own experience, this is where ChatOps are taking root. More mid-market customers come to us asking about chat platforms like Teams than the reverse (us introducing them to chat).

Will Slack actively court those mid-market companies? I know Teams does this. And you can bet other chat platforms will too.

 

Atlassian Logos
“Please don’t leave us too!”

The Question of Atlassian’s Other Products. I saw a few angry tweets after this announcement. HipChat/Stride users feeling betrayed. Not wanting to go to Slack; if they wanted that, they could have done so months prior.

Nothing says they have to move to Slack. But what if after the February cutoff, they abandon the entire Atlassian product base?

Teams does have Add-Ons for integrating Atlassian tools like Trello and Jira. You can also duplicate much of their functions with other Add-Ons or cloud services. Even so, this could end up hurting Atlassian’s overall product base. I would NOT encourage this (I like Trello!) …but it’s undoubtedly possible.

 

The “Work Processing” Question. I came across this in a CMSWire article covering the announcement. I quote from the section titled, “‘Work Processing’ Tools Emerging”:

Boyd noted that despite enterprise collaboration tools like Slack, Teams and Facebook grabbing headlines, a new generation of document-centered tools — Quip, Notion.so, Slite, Nuclino, and others — are gaining steam. He calls them “work processing” tools. They support shared documents with styled text, embedded objects (tables, videos, images), tasks and checklists and social affordances: threaded comments, internal notifications and messaging.

“In this approach,” Boyd said, “documents are not just dumb files with styled text, sitting in a cloud file system. Instead of relying on work chat communications, which are only structured by channels and search, work processing relies on a system of documents to structure company information and discourse. This can also be integrated with work chat, or may include work chat internally. A trend to keep an eye on.”

I fiddled with Notion.so a little. It’s similar to a Wiki, using Markdown and simple workspaces. Since it’s document-based, not chat-based, this sort of tool represents a totally different approach from Slack or Teams. (I may do a more in-depth comparison in the future; it’s got a certain appeal.)

These newer products may tempt people away from Slack into a leaner, more all-in-one workspace. It may become a wild card in adoption/migration.

 

The Privacy Question. I’ve mentioned HipChat Data Center when talking about the Redis Cache, and the Skype4B Quagmire. Like Skype for Business Server, one of its biggest advantages was the privacy benefits of on-prem deployment.

Now we have one less option for those companies who require on-prem data control.

You do still have Skype for Business Server 2015/2019, of course. But with its future uncertain, some might see switching off HipChat to Skype for Business as a risky bet.

“But Slack protects your data privacy too!” Correct! So does Teams. The issue here isn’t what privacy protections exist…it’s whether companies will accept cloud-based privacy vs. on-prem privacy they control. It’s a comfort issue, not a technical one.

 

Finally, the Mattermost Challenger. Mattermost competes with Slack, but is open-source. Any organization can deploy it, either in a private cloud or on-prem.

Here’s the kicker. Mattermost also integrates with other Atlassian products: Jira, Bitbucket, Trello. It not only competes with Slack, it can directly target the HipChat/Stride users Atlassian wants to shuttle over to Slack.

Setting up Mattermost requires a little more technical know-how than Slack, which may get in the way of courting HipChat/Stride users. Nevertheless, more tech-oriented companies may consider jumping ship to Mattermost instead.

 

Predictions for Post-Discontinuation (Feb 2019)

Abandoned ChatOps
Okay, I’m here for the meeting! …guys?

Photo by Yener Ozturk on Unsplash.

As I like to do, I’ll close with some predictions. In light of questions like these, what will happen after HipChat & Stride go offline in February?

  1. The majority of Stride users will switch to Slack with little fuss.
  2. A large portion of HipChat users will move to Slack as well.
  3. A small percentage of companies running HipChat Data Center will continue to do so, even without Atlassian support.
  4. Trello, Jira, and Confluence will all suffer drops in usage. Since users have to abandon HipChat and Stride, some companies will abandon all Atlassian products at the same time.
  5. Teams/Office 365 will see a small boost in user growth after February, from those HipChat/Stride users who don’t want/can’t use Slack.
  6. “Work Processing” tools like Notion.so will see growth on an organic basis. The HipChat-to-Slack transition won’t have much of an effect.

 

Additional Links:
Slack and Microsoft Teams: Is Enterprise Collaboration a Two Horse Race? – CMS Wire
How Slack and Atlassian Landed a Sharp Jab in Microsoft’s Ribs – CIODive.com
Atlassian-Slack Partnership FAQ

Do you use HipChat or Stride? What will your company do in light of the discontinuation?

6 Questions about Atlassian Discontinuing HipChat & Stride
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